News Articles

DNA of Good Bacteria

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

DNA OF GOOD BACTERIA DRIVES INTESTINAL RESPONSE TO INFECTION

A new study shows that the
DNA of so-called “good bacteria” that normally live in the intestines may help defend the body against infection.

The findings, available October 2 online in the journal Immunity, are reported by Yasmine Belkaid, Ph.D., and her colleagues in the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

A person normally has 300 to 500 species of beneficial bacteria, known as commensals, in their intestines. These bacteria are not harmful and, in fact, help an individual maintain his or her digestive health. Typically, the immune system does not attack gut commensals, even though they are bacteria.

“Within the body of a healthy adult, microbial cells vastly outnumber human cells. Research to understand these microbial communities is an exciting scientific frontier,” says Anthony S. Fauci, MD, NIAID director.  “Among many opportunities related to the so-called ‘microbiome,’ targeting beneficial bacteria may offer new avenues for therapy against infectious and immune-mediated diseases.”

Dr Jarir Nakouzi.Com