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Formaldehyde Exposure

FORMALDEHYDE EXPOSURE AMONG INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF CANCERS OF THE BLOODAND LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Results from an ongoing study of workers employed at plants that used or produced formaldehyde continue to show a possible link between formaldehyde exposure and death from cancers of the blood and lymphatic system, particularly myeloid leukemia. The report, by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (
NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, provides an additional 10 years of follow-up data to build on previous findings from this study.  The report appeared online May 12, 2009, and in printMay 20, 2009, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“The overall patterns of risk seen in this extended follow-up of industrial workers, while not definitive, are consistent with a causal association between formaldehyde exposure and cancers of the blood and lymphatic system and warrant continued concern.  Further studies are needed to evaluate risks of these cancers in other formaldehyde-exposed populations and to assess possible biological mechanisms,” said lead author of the report, Laura E. Beane Freeman, Ph.D., NCI Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

Formaldehyde is widely used for industrial purposes and as a preservative and disinfectant.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies this chemical as a human carcinogen, based primarily on its association with nasopharyngeal cancer.  In 1995, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration estimated that approximately 2.1 million workers in the United States were exposed to formaldehyde.

Dr Jarir Nakouzi.Com